Monday, September 22, 2008

What would it take?

If I were to open this place tomorrow, on a shoe string budget, as a concession type stand at an open air (flea) market, what would it take?

So things I know I would need: Chicken, ham, veggies, spices, rice, rice cooker, bowls, plastic-ware, drinks, grill, cooler, ice, propane, utensils, napkins, signage, oil, trash can, trash bags, register, cash, change, pen and paper, a location.

Hmmm... What am I missing? What don't I know?

I know for the rice cooker(s) I will need electricity. I am not sure that will be available. I also have no idea how much of anything I would need. Will I have 20 customers or 200? All things being equal, I would rather run out of stuff than have too much.

I also want to know how much getting a spot would cost, I need to know where that spot is located, is it even in a good place? What are the other places around this spot? How's the foot traffic? Is it next to one of those incense burning places that always give me a headache?

What if it rains or some other type of weather becomes a factor? Do I need some kind of insurance mandated by the open air market?

I am for sure going to take a look at some open air markets this weekend. I will be trying to answer these questions and look for questions that I have not asked.

Feel free to add to my list, as they would be much appreciated. Thanks,

-H

6 comments:

JESUS ARREDONDO said...

A health permit. Most locales require that you have a permit for these kinds of sales. This will usually be afforded by the local jurisdiction -- Municipality or County Health Department. Good luck, Hank!

Andyman said...

What interests me these days are primarily two things.

1) Healthy foods
2) Decadent foods like desserts that taste good and aren't nearly so bad for you as "the real thing"

I've been spending a lot of time thinking about opening a fast and healthy kind of place. Basically, kind of like Subway or whatever, but basically, healthy whole grain breads, lean meats and fish with a focus on low saturated fats.

One of the biggest problems facing our society in terms of nutrition is that people are so confused about what is good food and what is bad food. A lot of people think fats are bad, but really, only saturated and trans fats are bad for you. (Although they all have lots of calories, and moderating calorie intake is important too)

But basically, what I'd LOVE, is to find a place that is totally healthy, whole grain breads, brown rice, only canola or olive oils, pastas and eggs with high omega-3 content. The problem with fast food is they are so concerned with profit margin that they use poor quality ingredients because they cost less.

I'd like to open a place that uses only top quality, healthy, fresh, preservative free stuff, maybe even some vegan and/or vegetarian stuff, healthy pasta salads and sandwiches. And healthy desserts, like granola parfaits, fruit salads, fat free and low sugar frozen yogurt, etc. I guess my only tough choice would be the divergence between "whole foods" and "diet foods" with things like artificial sweeteners. I partake of "unhealthy" foods to cut calories, like things with aspartame or splenda.

Basically the thing is I love to get a nice lunch prepared for me, but I have to cook myself if I want to make sure they don't sneak in poisons on me. I'd pay a lot more if I knew I could get a "fast food" meal that was absolutely healthy. I think the focus will continue to go this way as our country's weight crisis continues to increase in magnitude. (Pardon the pun)

Anonymous said...

Well,
After figuring out what kind of place you want, get the location. After you close on the location let me know because you will need an architect, we eat permits for breakfast (and do great design too).

A.Z.

Anonymous said...

By the way permits are low on calories and high on fiber.

A.Z.

zack said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
zack said...

Have you ever thought about opening a private franchise? I met a business development group that helped me get started in business for next to nothing and all it took was a little sweat equity to start making money. Let me know if you're open to looking at other business options.

selfmadeinamerica@gmail.com

Great blog by the way! I can tell you have been reading a lot of the same books I have.